American schools vs melting pot

Rod Janzen In the past, multicultural education often attempted to assimilate new groups into a single American culture. Now, tradition has a rival: In recent years, many educators have supported multicultural education as a way to deal with global interconnectedness and America's increasingly multiethnic population. What is disconcerting is that educators have yet to agree on what multiculturalism really is or how it might affect curriculum and teaching.

American schools vs melting pot

Rod Janzen In the past, multicultural education often attempted to assimilate new groups into a single American culture. Now, tradition has a rival: What is disconcerting is that educators have yet to agree on what multiculturalism really is or how it might affect curriculum and teaching.

Indeed, two different—and diametrically opposed—perspectives of multiculturalism are currently vying for predominance. The goal of cultural pluralism is that ethnic groups will remain intact and that their idiosyncratic ways of knowing and acting will be respected and continued.

Assimilationism, on the other hand, accepts the importance of understanding multiple beliefs, but has as its primary goal the amalgamation of all groups into the American mainstream.

America is not a melting pot, or a salad bowl. America is a supermarket with all the ingredients to make melting pots, salad bowls, sushi platters, steak dishes, vegetarian plates, kosher sandwiches, shish-kebabs and other meals that haven't been invented yet. Alarian, Hannah M., "The Melting Pot Versus the Salad Bowl: American Attitudes Toward Acculturation of Middle Eastern Immigrants" (). THE MELTING POT VERSUS THE SALAD BOWL: AMERICAN ATTITUDES TOWARD ACCULTURATION OF MIDDLE EASTERN IMMIGRANTS A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY FO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL environment of America as a melting. The melting pot is a monocultural metaphor for a heterogeneous society becoming more homogeneous, the different elements "melting together" into a harmonious whole with a common culture or vice versa, for a homogeneous society becoming more heterogeneous through the influx of foreign elements with different cultural background with a potential creation of disharmony with the previous culture.

Many educators have not recognized the dual philosophies underlying multiculturalism, and the result has been a good deal of confusion in multicultural education. Teachers have thus at times developed curricular materials that are at odds with school district philosophies Janzen Assimilationism American education has traditionally been assimilationist.

Educators with this view believe that studying other cultures is worthwhile in that it leads to better relationships among ethnic groups and enables the dominant culture to select and adopt significant non-Western cultural accomplishments.

Assimilationist educators might support bilingual education, but not primarily so that students might maintain and appreciate their own language and culture.

Instead, assimilationists value bilingual education as the quickest way for non-English-speaking Americans to become literate in English. In the s, programs to incorporate all groups into a single culture are likely to try to meet the needs of individual students and accommodate their idiosyncratic backgrounds.

Educators structure activities in such a way that all newcomers eventually melt together in the pot. Assimilationists know, however, that their position is under attack.

They fear the strength and solidarity of cultural pluralism, and sometimes they sharply deplore what they see as its end result. Jarolimekfor example, declared: Cultural Pluralism To cultural pluralists, having one set of cultural principles amounts to imperialism toward minority groups.

Multiculturalism, this group believes, should not only develop appreciation for the perspectives of others, but should sustain a value-tolerant acceptance of diverse cultural understandings, belief systems, customs, and perhaps sociopolitical traditions.

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Horace Kallen formulated the notion of cultural pluralism in Every culture has its own internal coherence, integrity, and logic; No culture is inherently better or worse than another; and All persons are to some extent culturally bound.

Pluralist educational experiences promote the value of retaining cultures, not simply tolerating them or melting them down PizzilloBanks Pluralist teachers and their students try to construct meaning together and thereby create an empowering environment Tiedt and Tiedt Cultural pluralism is not, however, altogether separatist.

Many of its adherents value national unity and equal interaction among ethnic groups. The contest between traditions in multiculturalism is also an absolutist versus relativist disagreement. Americans have historically subscribed to principles of constitutional democracy, which are grounded in the Judeo-Christian heritage.

Historical judgments are yet another zone of contention. A Double Bind for Teachers Confusion has arisen as schools have asked social science teachers to infuse pluralist multiculturalism into their courses at the same time that they tell them to produce graduates who are culturally literate in the traditional sense.

Additional confusion stems from the reality that teachers must make choices among many topics and curriculum materials, which may take either assimilationist or pluralist perspectives. Take, for example, the western migration of white Americans.

Melting Pot or Mosaic? - Educational Leadership

Curriculum documents, personal beliefs, and community pressure may demand that social science teachers present white westward migration as a great exploratory achievement that spread civilization from sea to shining sea.

Teachers, other educators, parent groups, and students need to enter into continued dialogue about the assumptions and interpretations that underlie various multicultural curriculum approaches.

American schools vs melting pot

For example, in an interchange about the multicultural assumptions in historical accounts of westward migration, teachers and students might discuss this remark from a Native American: But in time I found that those were not enough. Civilized people depend too much on man-made printed pages DeRoche Even if we do not reach general consensus about which path of multiculturalism to take, educators and students must understand that different paths exist and that different classroom activities may fall on one or the other pathway.

Placing ideas within a conceptual approach encourages students to think critically and make connections among a variety of viewpoints. As we engage in such discussions and analyses, we may ultimately come to a clearer understanding of what multiculturalism means for the curriculum in American schools.

Step inside actual classrooms and district offices to see how teachers, principals, and administrators from Garvey School District and Falls Church High School establish successful programs by 1 ensuring equal opportunities for all students to learn, 2 developing cultural awareness among students and teachers, 3 emphasizing multiculturalism in instruction and curriculum, and 4 providing opportunities for community involvement.

America: Melting Pot vs. Salad Bowl - New York Essays

Multicultural Education can serve as either an introduction for audiences new to the concept or as a source of practical ideas for more experienced viewers. Together, the workshop activities and the video program present valuable information for educators seeking to address the challenges, and benefit from the opportunities, presented by their increasingly diverse student populations.

American schools vs melting pot

Reflections on Cultural and Multicultural Man.The melting pot theory is a metaphor for describing the assimilation of immigrants into American culture. It relies on the image of people from different cultures and backgrounds mixing and melting together into one big cultural pot.

America: Melting Pot vs. Salad Bowl This can be applied to the demographic make-up of a specific place and sometimes at the organizational level such as schools, neighborhoods or nations. The normative term is often referred to ideologies or politics that promote this diversity or its institutionalization.

(“Melting Pot America. America: Melting Pot vs. Salad Bowl This can be applied to the demographic make-up of a specific place and sometimes at the organizational level such as schools, neighborhoods or nations.

The normative term is often referred to ideologies or politics that promote this diversity or its institutionalization. The American melting pot, the.

America is not a melting pot, or a salad bowl. America is a supermarket with all the ingredients to make melting pots, salad bowls, sushi platters, steak dishes, vegetarian plates, kosher sandwiches, shish-kebabs and . American education has traditionally been assimilationist.

Educators with this view believe that studying other cultures is worthwhile in that it leads to better relationships among ethnic groups and enables the dominant culture to select and adopt significant non-Western cultural accomplishments. America: Melting Pot vs.

Salad Bowl Multiculturalism is also known as ethnic diversity relating to communities containing multiple cultures. The term is used in two different broad ways, descriptively and normatively.

Melting Pot or Mosaic? - Educational Leadership